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Top ten rules of economical writing

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❶On a more serious note, this short and sweet book will definitely benefit students and academics.

March 23, 2010




Her thirty-one rules, offered with wit and delightful brevity, include the essential warning that though rules can help, bad rules hurt. Is this language English and not the Academic Official Style? Does McCloskey write with a sense that is also a sense of humor?

This entertaining volume will teach you how to write meaningful and joyful economics. Students can learn to write so that the professor will know what they mean and, more important, professors can learn to write so that the rest of the world will know what they mean.

Economical Writing should be required reading for students at the dissertation stage. Professionals should read and reread it to keep the bad habits from creeping back into their writing.

Writing Is Thinking 3. Fluency Can Be Achieved by Grit 8. Both are highly recommended. Here is the short version, based on the executive summary, and my own interpretation:. And, by the way, my students told me that the business writing and communication courses taught in the English department failed to cover writing a research paper.

The course seems to focus on writing memos and resumes. Posted by John Whitehead on March 23, at Whitehead, Econ Journal Watch , 14 3: Whitehead, Haab and Huang: Preference Data for Environmental Valuation. Valuing Environmental and Natural Resources.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: Subscribe in a reader. Bringing to bear a large quantity of external sources and articles, this blog presents a clear vision of what economic environmentalism can be. Get some ink, just don't stop blogging. My colleagues and I actually laughed out loud at some of the posts! What they actually say is more like this: Two spaces after a comma is barbaric This deserves four stars, but lost one due to the completely baffling decision to advise readers to include two spaces after a comma.

Jul 17, Trey Malone rated it it was amazing. I would never claim that I'm a great writer, but as I finish my PhD in applied economics, I've found that there are three surefire ways to improve your writing. First, you need practice and meaningful feedback. Second, you need to be critically examining other comparable texts constantly so you can see what good writing looks like.

And third, you should buy this book and thumb through it often. McCloskey lays out some very insightful guidelines for crafting a strong economic argument, and anyone I would never claim that I'm a great writer, but as I finish my PhD in applied economics, I've found that there are three surefire ways to improve your writing.

McCloskey lays out some very insightful guidelines for crafting a strong economic argument, and anyone challenged to write for an academic audience would do well to examine those guidelines.

May 01, Don Lim rated it really liked it. McCloskey does not provide any new advice on writing better, but she does collect existing advice from other books and compiles them, focusing more specifically on writing in the subject of economics.

Although some of her advice is a bit dated such as using two spaces after a period, question mark, or exclamation mark , many are useful and would improve writing, if kept in mind.

A few examples include: All these McCloskey does not provide any new advice on writing better, but she does collect existing advice from other books and compiles them, focusing more specifically on writing in the subject of economics. All these are commonsense, yet few writers follow simple advice. She emphasizes heavily to write in a manner so readers cannot possibly misunderstand.

Yet as I have read some of the other reviews, the other reviewers are either dunces or deliberately twisting her words. For instance, when she writes about how astronomers attempting to understand the motion of the sun, they would do well to stop saying the sun is "rising. While many laymen and perhaps even astronomers may use sentence, "the sun is rising" casually, to understand the underlying mechanism, astronomers must begin to use terms such as time-space, inertia, and even include mathematical functions in order to more deeply understand astronomy.

The same, she argues, applies to economics. Laymen have often used cutthroat, exploitation, skyrocketing, and other such words to hazily explain, or often intentionally obscure, economic concepts. If you have read other books giving advice on good writing, you may find McCloskey's book does not add much. She does herself recommend rulebooks that she found helpful, a few which were: Toward Clarity and Grace.

Overall Economical Writing was a quick, joyful read and it is also clear McCloskey had fun writing. For me it has helped keep surface the rules of good writing.

Jun 03, John Edgar Mihelic rated it really liked it. Most academics probably last took a class in writing their freshman year, maybe sophomore unless they are of the sort who found a way to test out of that. And oddly enough the ones with the least training in writing are the most didactic about how a paper looks - inhaled some sport of prescriptivism in eight grade and never let it go. Even those of us who beleive in constant improvement can benefit from multiple angles.

This is a strunk and white for the social science set, and using it to loo Most academics probably last took a class in writing their freshman year, maybe sophomore unless they are of the sort who found a way to test out of that. This is a strunk and white for the social science set, and using it to look over my own writing in the past year has helped.

Amazing book on how to write better I only found out about this book because it is required reading for one of my postgraduate courses. Kudos to my professor, because this book is incredible. McCloskey's writing is so succinct, friendly and easy to read, and her advice on writing is already helping me improve my uni assignments. I'd definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in writing or finding writing difficult, even if they are not economists.

Jun 13, Chloe' Henson rated it it was amazing. Transitioning from undergraduate to graduate writing techniques is very difficult for me. I've gotten several papers back with red marks all over them. After reading this, I understood why I was receiving so many red marks. The author lays out several rules and details that help the reader understand more efficient ways to write exactly what you are meaning to say.

I wouldn't say it is a "how-to" book, but this book has definitely helped me already in my writing. Jun 28, Max Lauber rated it it was amazing.

This slim book probably taught me more about writing in a week than two and a half years of Language Skills and Culture did. Although the book targets economists specifically, I recommend it to anyone who wants to improve their writing.

Oct 02, Phoebe Phelange rated it liked it Shelves: A short book jam packed with good advice though there were a few I did not agree with. Jun 25, Jadrian Wooten rated it liked it. It was cute, but I'm not sure how useful it will really be. Jan 23, Jack Raia rated it really liked it. Book makes the point that much of academic writing is terrible. Clarity is stressed along with ways to make writing readable.

Jan 02, Rachel Crowley rated it really liked it. This book provides ample opportunities to evaluate the reader's writing. The author provides a variety of insights that are obvious when pointed out, but are often ignored. Jan 11, Ben Labe rated it really liked it. Deirdre McCloskey is an adequate writer, which is to say, a better writer than almost all economists.

Most writing handbooks are exactly what they most admonish: They tend to be dry and uninviting. Understanding that irony well, McCloskey has imbued "Economical Writing" with just enough wit and excursus to make it pleasurable.

The book's funniest moments are when she sneaks the mistakes that she is describing into her descriptions of them, as in the chapter titled "The Order Around S Deirdre McCloskey is an adequate writer, which is to say, a better writer than almost all economists. The book's funniest moments are when she sneaks the mistakes that she is describing into her descriptions of them, as in the chapter titled "The Order Around Switch It Until It Sounds Good".

Who knew that I could finish 90 pages of advise about how to write? Evidently Deirdre McCloskey did. Beyond being merely readable, the book is also useful. McCloskey is wary of rules, so instead she provides a list of heuristics.


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McCloskey is the Strunk and White of economics, and Economic Writing should be required reading for all economists." -- Claudia Goldin, Harvard University "McCloskey tells economists to say what they have to say clearly and /5(67).

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A review of Economical Writing by Deirdre McCloskey There is a certain paradox inherent in the "style manual": Legislating style is like legislating personality. If we all followed such manuals to the letter, we'd all sound alike, and the world would be a boring place indeed/5.

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6. Use active verbs rather than passive ones to add life to your writing. Delete the word "is" whenever possible and rewrite the sentence using an active verb. 7. Be concrete – give examples rather than discussing things in vague terms. Discuss the supply and demand for gasoline, rather than the supply and demand for good X. 8. writing. 9. Minimize use of doublets. Doublets are two words that mean essentially the same thing, used alongside each other in a sentence. Using the same ideas or phrases when a single of solitary one would do is a certain and sure-fire way of writing an unreadable and confusing report. Pick the best word and use it; do not say everything .

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McCloskey is the Strunk and White of economics, and Economical Writing should be required reading for all economists.” —Claudia Goldin, Harvard University “McCloskey tells economists to say what they have to say clearly and . Economical Writing by Deirdre McCloskey 1. Write simple, direct sentences whenever possible. Absolutely no one is impressed by a sentence they cannot understand. The quality of your economic logic is what counts, not big words or complicated sentences. 2. Rewrite and edit your first draft—and your second one, too. Easy writing makes .